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P11.01 Oncological outcomes of laparoscopic versus open radical total gastrectomy for upper-middle gastric cancer after neoadjuvant chemotherapy

April, 04, 2024 | Select Oncology Journal Articles

Background

Laparoscopic technique has been increasingly used in gastrectomy, but the safety and feasibility of the laparoscopic total gastrectomy (LTG) for advanced proximal gastric cancer (PGC) after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is unclear.

Materials and Methods

A retrospective analysis of 146 patients who received NAC followed by radical total gastrectomy at Fujian Medical University Union Hospital from January 2008 to December 2018 was performed. The primary endpoints were long-term outcomes.

Results

The patients were divided into two groups: 89 were in the LTG group and 57 were in the open total gastrectomy (OTG) group. The LTG group had a significantly shorter operative time (median 173 min vs. 215 min, p < 0.001), less intraoperative bleeding (62 ml vs. 135 ml, p < 0.001), higher total lymph-node (LN) dissections (36 vs 31, p=0.043), and higher total chemotherapy cycle completion rate (≥ 8 cycles) (37.1% vs. 19.7%, p = 0.027) than OTG. The 3-year overall survival (OS) of the LTG group was significantly higher than that of the OTG group (60.7% vs. 35%, p = 0.0013). Survival with inverse probability weighting(IPW) correction for Lauren type, ypTNM stage, NAC schemes and the times at which the surgery was performed showed that there was no significant difference in OS between the two groups (p = 0.463). Postoperative complications (25.8% vs. 33.3%, p = 0.215) and recurrence-free survival (RFS) (p = 0.561) between the LTG and OTG groups were also comparable.

Conclusions

In experienced gastric cancer surgery centers, LTG is recommended as the preferred option for such patients who performed NAC, owing to its long-term survival is not inferior to OTG, and it offers less intraoperative bleeding, better chemotherapy tolerance than conventional open surgery.

S. Li-LI: None. G. You-xin: None. Z. Zhi-wei: None.

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